QUALITY OF LIFE: A SYSTEMIC DEFINITION, PARTIAL-ORDER MEASUREMENT, AND DATA ANALYTIC STRUCTURES

Abstract. The concept of happiness, not unlike happiness itself, is evasive. Renaming it human well-being or human quality of life (QOL) has been of little help. Yet, it is a key concept in evaluating the actual utility of actions taken in personal life as well as in national life.A top-down systemic theory is presented, yielding a structured generic set of QOL components that, under simple assumptions, are argued to be exclusive and exhaustive. Analyses by Multidimensional scaling (MDS) of survey data collected from diverse populations largely support hypotheses about the structure of the systemic QOL.Next, partial order dimensionality is defined for meaningfully measuring human QOL. The logic of graduating the measurement-space base-coordinates, through procedure of successive refinements, is illustrated.Finally, applications of the systemic quality of life theory to questions such as evaluating a nuclear power plant in the Negev, or the dynamics of psycho-therapeutic student counseling, are briefly presented.

Location: 
Elath Hall, 2nd floor, Feldman Building, Edmond J. Safra Campus
Dates: 
Friday, April 20, 2007 - 10:00 to 12:00
Old Lecturers: 
SAMUEL SHYE
Old Lecturers University: 
THE VAN LEER JERUSALEM INSTITUTE AND THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY